Japanese Beetle

Adult beetles aren’t hard to identify: If you see skeletonized leaves, you’ll also see enough of these metallicbronze pests around to make a positive ID.

Last Seen in the Vicinity of . . .

All states east of the Mississippi River and occasionally in California.

Japanese Beetle

Crime

Adults feed during the day, especially in warm weather and on plants in full sun. They chew on flowers and skeletonize leaves, which wilt and drop; if populations are large, they may completely defoliate plants. Japanese beetles feed on a wide range of vegetables (especially asparagus, beans, corn, okra, onions, rhubarb, and tomatoes), trees, shrubs, vines, and fruits, as well as many flowers and ornamentals. Larvae feed on roots of turf and other grasses, causing irregular patches of dead or wilted turf in spring and again in fall. Turf may be torn up by crows, raccoons, and other animals searching for larvae.

Description

Adults are blocky, metallic blue-green beetles, 1?2 inch long, with tufts of white hairs along the sides of the abdomen. They have bronze-colored wing covers and long legs with large claws. Larvae are fat, dirty white, C-shaped grubs, up to 3?4 inch long, with brown heads; they are found in sod.

Crime Prevention

` Cover plants with floating row covers. ` Attract native species of parasitic wasps and flies with nectar and pollen plants. ` Allow your lawn to dry out well between waterings in midsummer, or stop watering and allow the lawn to go dormant in summer, so beetle eggs dry out.

Sentence `

In early morning, handpick beetles, vacuum them from plants with a hand-held vacuum cleaner, or shake them from plants onto ground sheets and destroy them. ` To control larvae, apply milky disease spores or insect parasitic nematodes to the sod. ` Organize a communitywide trapping program (placing traps in a single yard has been shown to be ineffective). ` Aerate the lawn with spiked sandals in late spring and early fall to kill larvae while they are close to the surface.Sentence ` In early morning, handpick beetles, vacuum them from plants with a hand-held vacuum cleaner, or shake them from plants onto ground sheets and destroy them. ` To control larvae, apply milky disease spores or insect parasitic nematodes to the sod. ` Organize a communitywide trapping program (placing traps in a single yard has been shown to be ineffective). ` Aerate the lawn with spiked sandals in late spring and early fall to kill larvae while they are close to the surface.